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Tag Archives: Madagascar

Aid Watch Rerun: The lure of starting from scratch

NOTE FROM THE EDITORS: Over the holidays, we’ll be publishing reruns of some of our posts from the first 2 years of Aid Watch. This post originally ran on June 17, 2010.

It is an acknowledged national characteristic that Americans believe in self-reinvention. One of our founding myths—inspired by the once unexplored and sparsely populated expanse of the North American continent—is the idea that you can head out of town, leave the encumbrances of the past…

Posted in Aid debates, Aid policies and approaches, Maps | Also tagged , 5 Comments

Chronicle of a death foretold

When the article Madagascar: Textile Industry Unravels came across our desks yesterday, we were saddened but not surprised. That’s because people on the ground have been predicting this outcome (and Aid Watch has been stubbornly blogging about it over and over). Multiple critics have protested ever since the US government, hoping to force President Andry Rajoelina’s questionable government to hold elections, first threatened to remove preferential trading rights for…

Posted in Trade | Also tagged , 24 Comments

Madagascar textile workers ask President Obama to keep their jobs for Christmas, but nobody is listening

Here’s an excerpt from an ad that appeared in the print edition of Politico today, paid for by the owners of apparel factories in Madagascar and one of their American investor partners. We have blogged about this seemingly obscure issue already many more times than you, our patient readers, may have wanted, but we see this as one of those rare, clear opportunities for the US to do good by first…

Posted in Aid policies and approaches, Trade | Also tagged , 14 Comments

USTR Replies to Our Campaign to Save Madagascar Jobs

After sending an email to Constance Hamilton, Deputy Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Africa, we received the following email in response:

Thank you, Mr. Easterly, for your email. We of course, want to have as
many sub-Saharan African countries as possible be eligible for AGOA
benefits. We are working with all the countries, including Madagascar
– to encourage their governments to abide by the AGOA eligibility
criteria, particularly rule…

Posted in Aid policies and approaches, Democracy and freedom, Trade | Also tagged , 5 Comments

Hopeless cause of the week: save Madagascar!

Aid Watch has a stubborn attachment to excellent but possibly hopeless causes…

Madagascar, a country we first blogged about in June and then again in August, may be down to its last few days as regards AGOA, the US preference program that underpins about 50 percent of the country’s $500 million textile industry.  Because of the change of government that took place in Madagascar in March, the US has been steadily threatening…

Posted in In the news, Trade | Also tagged 4 Comments

Hillary offers trade opportunities to Africa – unless we don’t feel like it

Hilary-AGOA.png Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had good news for Africa in the Nairobi forum yesterday on the US African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). AGOA offers breaks from quotas and duties on African exports to the US. First enacted under Bush, AGOA is at least a partial success story, with exemplars like textile exports in Lesotho and Madagascar. Secretary Clinton yesterday endorsed new efforts to “maximize the promise of AGOA.” She declared “we…

Posted in In the news, Trade | Also tagged , , 14 Comments

Here’s a US development program working – stop it immediately!

AGOA_logo2.jpg

“[O]pen trade and international investment are the surest and fastest ways for Africa to make progress,” President Bush said when he signed an extension to the African Growth and Opportunities Act (AGOA) in 2004. Originally signed into law in 2000, AGOA removes US quotas and duties for thousands of products coming from some 40 sub-Saharan African countries.

AGOA has led to an overall increase of 8% in non-oil exports to the US, according to…

Posted in Aid policies and approaches, Big ideas, Trade | Also tagged , 13 Comments